Watch photographer Levi Bettwieser of The Rescued Film Project discover and process 31 rolls of film shot by an American WWII soldier over 70 years ago. Bettwieser knows nothing about the person who shot the film or who it belonged to, but these never seen before photos offer a glimpse into the mind of the soldier/photographer as he captured the tumultuous world around him.

Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/videos/developing-lost-film-shot-by-wwii-soldier/

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (1)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

What looks to be an ‘exploded view‘ of a 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR taken at a microsecond in time, is actually a meticulous and painstakingly crafted artificial moment by artist and photographer Fabian Oefner.

In Disintegrating, Fabian sketches where the individual pieces will go. He then takes apart a model car piece by piece; from the body shell right down to the minuscule screws. Each car contains hundreds of components.

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (9)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Oefner then places each piece individually with the aid of fine needles and pieces of string. After meticulously working out the angle of each shot and establishing the right lighting, he photographs the components. It takes thousands of photographs to create each image in the series.

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (8)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

The individual photos are then blended together in post-production to create a single image. With the wheels acting as a reference point, each part is masked in Photoshop and then cut and pasted into the final image.

Jaguar E-Type 1961

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (3)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery
slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (6)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

“These are possibly the ‘slowest high-speed’ images ever captured. It took almost two months to create an image that looks as if it was captured in a fraction of a second. The whole disassembly in itself took more than a day for each car due to the complexity of the models. But that’s a bit of a boy thing. There’s an enjoyment in the analysis, discovering something by taking it apart, like peeling an onion.” – Fabian Oefner

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (5)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery
slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (7)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

“What you see in these images, is a moment that never existed in real life. What looks like a car falling apart is in fact a moment in time that has been created artificially by blending hundreds of individual images together. There is a unique pleasure about artificially building a moment… Freezing a moment in time is stupefying.” – Fabian Oefner

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (4)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Ferrari 330 P4 1967

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (2)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Limited editions of 25 prints per image (120 cm X 70 cm) are available through the MB&F M.A.D Gallery (Price: CHF 1’900. including VAT). Located in Geneva, Switzerland, The MB&F M.A.D.Gallery is a place of kinetic art where horological machines and mechanical art devices reign supreme.

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Sworn Virgins of Albania (Albanian: burrnesha or virgjinesha) are women who take a vow of chastity and wear male clothing in order to live as men in the patriarchal society of northern Albania.

In a photo series and upcoming documentary entitled He/She/He, Jill Peters explains/a>:

Sworn Virgin is the term given to a biological female in the Balkans who has chosen, usually at an early age, to take on the social identity of a man for life. As a tradition dating back hundreds of years, this was sometimes necessary in a society that lived within tribal clans, followed the Kanun, an archaic code of law, and maintained an oppressive rule over the female gender. The Kanun states that women are the property of their husbands. The freedom to vote, drive, conduct business, earn money, drink, smoke, swear, own a gun or wear pants was traditionally the exclusive province of men. Young girls were commonly forced into arranged marriages, often with much older men in distant villages. A family suddenly without a patriarch or male heir would find themselves in jeopardy of losing everything.
 
As an alternative, becoming a Sworn Virgin, or burnesha elevated a woman to the status of a man and granted her all the rights and privileges of the male population. In order to manifest the transition such a woman cut her hair, donned male clothing and sometimes even changed her name. Male gestures and swaggers were practiced until they became second nature. Most importantly of all, she took a vow of celibacy to remain chaste for life. She became a ‘he’.
 
Sworn Virgins still exist today, but as modernization inches towards the small villages nestled in the Albanian Alps, this archaic tradition is increasingly seen as obsolete. Only a handful remain.”

You can learn more about Albanian Sworn Virgins on Wikipedia. Below you will find five photos from Jill Peter’s fascinating series. You can see the project in its entirety on her official website. A trailer for He/She/He can be found at the end of the post.

[via PetaPixel, Slate, feature shoot]

albanian women that live as men by jill peters heshehe documentary (1)
Photograph by JILL PETERS
albanian women that live as men by jill peters heshehe documentary (4)
Photograph by JILL PETERS
albanian women that live as men by jill peters heshehe documentary (3)
Photograph by JILL PETERS
albanian women that live as men by jill peters heshehe documentary (2)
Photograph by JILL PETERS
albanian women that live as men by jill peters heshehe documentary (5)
Photograph by JILL PETERS


Elena Shumilova is mother to two young boys, Yaroslav (5) and Vanya (2). An architect by trade, the Russian artist only took up photography in 2012, wanting to capture the precious moments a mother witnesses as her children grow up.

The family owns a farm in Adreapol, Russia, where they have many animals including dogs, cats, ducks and rabbits. The special bond that can form between the animals and people is what she tries to capture through her photography. Shumilova tells Daily Mail that when she graduated University she spent a lot of time sketching and painting and it is this background that has come to define her photography and composition.

Be sure to check out her portfolio on Flickr and 500px, the dreamlike portraits are truly magical.

[Sources: Yahoo! Shine, Daily Mail, Huffington Post]

ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

1.

mother takes touching portraits of sons with animals elena shumilova (6)
Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

3.

mother takes touching portraits of sons with animals elena shumilova (2)
Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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mother takes touching portraits of sons with animals elena shumilova (3)
Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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mother takes touching portraits of sons with animals elena shumilova (1)
Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px

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mother takes touching portraits of sons with animals elena shumilova (5)
Photograph by ELENA SHUMILOVA
Flickr | Facebook | 500px