1. LA Jock is a a sportswear store in Los Angeles’ West Hollywood neighborhood.

2. To protest Russia’s anti-LGBT propaganda law, the owner, Nir Zilberman, has displayed a mannequin in his storefront window dressed in a concentration camp uniform with an upside-down pink triangle on its chest.

Nir Zilberman / Via Facebook: lajock

3. Zilberman placed this sign in front of the mannequin.

4. This is the profile picture for the LA Jock Facebook page.

5. Zilberman has also posted a video about his protest and the mannequin on Facebook.

6. Zilberman, who is the son of two Holocaust survivors, said he’s “sorry that a lot of Russian Jews got offended” by the display, but he does not regret his decision to put it up.

“I’m not ashamed of what I did. I’m proud of what I did,” he said. “I know where I’m coming from. My heart is all about love.”

7. Rabbi Denise Eger, whose synagogue Kol Ami is in West Hollywood and has many gay congregants, spoke at length with Zilberman about the mannequin. She believes that he’s motivated by the attention.

“There are plenty of ways for all of us, together, to draw attention to what’s happening to the LGBT community in Russia, with Putin’s new, horrific policy, without commercializing the Shoah,” Rabbi Eger said in an interview.

8. When Zilberman fainted during a rally he organized last Thursday in West Hollywood, an article also speculated whether this was all for his own attention.

Matt Baume / Via wehoville.com

9. Zilberman responded to the article with this message:

please the rally was not about me, 1000′s of people around the world support our RALLY, it was all about love. the store was all covered in black with posters of heroes. the screen was playing videos of our friends, gay men and women in Russia and in WWII.
it was all about “one voice” one single can create a war and one single person can make peace. life is a game and a choice to LOVE or HATE.
last night we show the world that love=life. silence=death.
you do not need to be a move star to be a leader, just follow you heart, we al WIN.
im not sur way this pics is even display here this was about people they care for people.
thank you for all the amazing emails, the text and all your support. this is just the start of
you will hear a lot about me and our people the can not have a voice, i will be they VOICE.
in israel and most countries gay pride was very small come to ISRAEL and see what one single person did, today 1000′s go gay, straight, all colors all religions come to ISRAEL
as ONE RACE. HUMAN RACE!. THANK YOU AGAIN ALL THE PEOPLE, ALL OVER THE WORLD. YOU GUYS THAT MADE THIS EVENT, it was all about LOVE!

10. Zilberman said the display will be up until the end of the Olympics Feb. 23.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/clairepires/la-store-owner-uses-gay-holocaust-symbol-to-protest-russias

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (1)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

What looks to be an ‘exploded view‘ of a 1954 Mercedes-Benz 300 SLR taken at a microsecond in time, is actually a meticulous and painstakingly crafted artificial moment by artist and photographer Fabian Oefner.

In Disintegrating, Fabian sketches where the individual pieces will go. He then takes apart a model car piece by piece; from the body shell right down to the minuscule screws. Each car contains hundreds of components.

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (9)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Oefner then places each piece individually with the aid of fine needles and pieces of string. After meticulously working out the angle of each shot and establishing the right lighting, he photographs the components. It takes thousands of photographs to create each image in the series.

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (8)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

The individual photos are then blended together in post-production to create a single image. With the wheels acting as a reference point, each part is masked in Photoshop and then cut and pasted into the final image.

Jaguar E-Type 1961

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (3)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery
slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (6)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

“These are possibly the ‘slowest high-speed’ images ever captured. It took almost two months to create an image that looks as if it was captured in a fraction of a second. The whole disassembly in itself took more than a day for each car due to the complexity of the models. But that’s a bit of a boy thing. There’s an enjoyment in the analysis, discovering something by taking it apart, like peeling an onion.” – Fabian Oefner

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (5)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery
slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (7)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

“What you see in these images, is a moment that never existed in real life. What looks like a car falling apart is in fact a moment in time that has been created artificially by blending hundreds of individual images together. There is a unique pleasure about artificially building a moment… Freezing a moment in time is stupefying.” – Fabian Oefner

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (4)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Ferrari 330 P4 1967

slowest high speed photos ever fabian oefner (2)
Photograph by FABIAN OEFNER
Website | Behance | 500px
Courtesy of the MB&F M.A.D Gallery

Limited editions of 25 prints per image (120 cm X 70 cm) are available through the MB&F M.A.D Gallery (Price: CHF 1’900. including VAT). Located in Geneva, Switzerland, The MB&F M.A.D.Gallery is a place of kinetic art where horological machines and mechanical art devices reign supreme.

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-f5ecaf2b05c8e48821d508ceb18063cb-54ddac298b28c’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-f5ecaf2b05c8e48821d508ceb18063cb-54ddac298b28c’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-f5ecaf2b05c8e48821d508ceb18063cb-54ddac298b28c’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

Five weeks ago, you broke up with the guy you once thought was “the one.”

The decision wasn’t easy, but at the time there was no question in your mind it was the right one. You were arguing every day, he was more devoted to his Xbox than to you and, most importantly, you just weren’t in love with him anymore.

After tearfully saying “goodbye” while simultaneously handing him a bag of weird T-shirts he had left at your apartment and your houseplant he was strangely attached to, you felt sad but good.

You were single and ready to mingle! You signed up for Tinder, Bumble and OkCupid. You were ready to take the dating world by storm.

Fast forward five weeks. You’re curled up in the fetal position in bed laughing hysterically while watching that one “South Park” episode your ex really loved (that you hated while you were together, by the way).

You’re halfway through a pint of Peanut Butter Cup Ben & Jerry’s (PSA: there’s like 1,500 calories in one of those things), and you really, really miss your ex.

You made the wrong decision, you’re sure of it. You would do anything to get him back, but from the looks of his Instagram photos he’s already moved on.

So, what’s going on with that? Here’s the deal.

Our brains are really good at remembering the good stuff.

When it comes to memory, our brains have something called a “positivity bias,” meaning it’s easier for our memories to recall that time you and your ex laughed until your cried or cuddled and drank wine during a snowstorm than it is to remember that huge screaming match you had at your sister’s wedding.

We’re conditioned to forget pain, at least to a certain extent. If you truly remembered how painful that half marathon you ran last spring was, would youreallywant to run another one?

Didn’t think so. Apply that thought process to the warm fuzzy feelings you’re currently having about your ex.


Those dates you were so excited about kind of suck.

The truth is, it’s hard to find a genuine connection with another person. Whether it’s over dinner, a drink or Netflix, it’s just not easy.

Even if you and your ex weren’t right for each other, you probably connected pretty well and were definitely super comfortable around each other.

So if sitting across from a stranger who you’re not that attracted to while sharing boring work stories isn’t doing it for you, we don’t blame you.

And wereallydon’t blame you if it makes you miss the easy conversations you used to have with your ex.

One day you will meet someone who makes you laugh as hard as your ex once did and who you’re crazy attracted to. Until then, you’ll just have to grin and bear the awkward dates.


You want what you can’t have.

You know that moment when you go on a diet and can no longer eat cake and cookies and suddenlyallyou want is cake and cookies?

That’s probably what’s happening with your ex. You cut off all contact (good for you — that’s the way to do it!) and suddenly he has never seemed more appealing.

Think about it like this: Eating that forbidden cookie would probably feel great in the moment, but afterward you would probably feel pretty bad about it. The same thing would happen if you called or texted your ex.

So don’t do it.


They look great in their photos.

Were those biceps there two months ago? Definitely not. Your ex didn’t even belong to a gym to take selfies at!

Not only is he looking great, but since your breakup your ex seems to be having a blast. His Instagram is full of photos of him with his friends and, even worse, groups of gorgeous girls you’ve never seen before.

There’s always a possibility that your ex really is having a blast, but let’s be real: He just go dumped.

He’s probably partying a lot and then going home and playing all the songs you used to listen to together. Come on!

As for those gym selfies, maybe he’s channeling his breakup angst into a new fitness routine. Or maybe he’s purposely trying to make you jealous.

Whatever the case, please unfollow him on Instagram right now.


You miss your best friend.

When you had a boyfriend, you had a built-in buddy to do everything with. He was part of your routine.

You loved sharing a few beers while staying in and watching Netflix on Friday nights, and you loved your Saturday morning runs and trips to the farmers’ market.

It’s hard to lose such a close friend, so surround yourself with girlfriends who will help distract you and lift you up.

Fill your weekends with activities that make you happy, and rejoice you no longer have to spend your Sunday afternoons drinking beer and watching football (unless that’s your thing, in which case, more power to you!).

One day you’ll find someone who is so much better for you than your ex ever was.

Until then, just remember: It’s called a breakup because it’s broken. Please don’t text him.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/wellness/why-you-want-your-ex-back/1316221/

Ascani_microsofthandson_-2

Microsoft’s Surface 2 unveiling on Sept. 23, 2013, was the first event where the Surface Mini was expected. Microsoft instead killed the product months later.
Image: Mashable, Christina Ascani

Microsoft has confirmed it cancelled plans to release a Surface Mini tablet in the spring.

During Tuesday’s quarterly earnings call, CFO Amy Hood said that part of the reason revenue from the company’s line of Surface tablets took a hit was because it had decided to kill an unreleased product.

“During the quarter, we reassessed our product roadmap and decided not to ship a new form factor that was under development,” Hood said. While she doesn’t identify the Surface Mini by name, other reports claimed Microsoft has scrapped plans to release the tablet late in the game, then the company accidentally confirmed the product’s existence in a user manual that referenced the Mini directly.

The decision to take the ax to the Surface Mini was reportedly influenced by CEO Satya Nadella, whose bid to reshape Microsoft includes a clear focus on productivity. While the company has many consumer-facing products (notably Xbox), Windows devices have been criticized as not serving small-screen tablet market as well as iPads and Android models, and market statistics reflect this.

The small-screen tablet market has grown quickly over the past two years, but Windows didn’t support those designs until fall 2013 with the release of Windows 8.1. It appeared inevitable that the Surface line would get a Mini version after that, but since smaller tablets are inherently more about consumption than productivity, such a product wouldn’t fit with Nadella’s vision of the new Microsoft.

When Microsoft held the next Surface product launch in May, it instead announced the Surface Pro 3, a 12-inch tablet that runs full Windows 8.1 Pro, powered by an Intel Core processor.

Other manufacturers have filled the void with small Windows tablets, and most run Windows 8.1, powered by Intel Atom chips. Lenovo was reportedly going to stop selling small Windows tablets in the U.S. due to lack of demand, but the company quickly reaffirmed its commitment to different-size tablets and said it would bring a new small Windows tablet to the American market before the end of 2014.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2014/07/23/surface-mini-killed/

Besides eating bamboo leaves I like all kind of oddities.

Being bored of usual buildings I have traveled the world (with the help of Internet) and found 50 strangest and most extraordinary churches in the world, and I’m kind enough to share it with you.

It was a tedious job for a lazy bored panda to compile such a big list, but I did it!

Oh, and I’m more Buddhist than Christian, so churches are no more than buildings for me. [Read more…]

But I have to admit, that the most wonderful buildings on earth are probably churches, monasteries and other religious structures. You can do much more with a lot of faith and a lack of money than with a lot of money but without any faith.

Enjoy scrolling down the list, while I eat another bamboo leaf.

1. The Church of Hallgrímur (Reykjavík, Iceland)

(Bamboo leaf for Stuck in Customs via www.boredpanda.com)

The Church of Hallgrímur is a Lutheran parish church which is also a very tall one, reaching 74.5 meters (244 ft) height. It is the fourth tallest architectural structure in Iceland.

It took incredibly long to build it (38 years!) Construction work began in 1945 and ended in 1986.

Architect: Guðjón Samúelsson

More info: Hallgrímur

2. Las Lajas Cathedral (Colombia, South America)

(Bamboo leaf for Jungle Boy via www.boredpanda.com)

(Bamboo leaf for julkastro via www.boredpanda.com)

Las Lajas Cathedral was built in 1916 inside the canyon of the Guaitara river where, according to local legend, the Virgin Mary appeared.

You can find it in southern Colombian Department of Narino, municipality of Ipiales, near the border with Ecuador.

3. Device to Root Out Evil (Calgary, AB, Canada)

(Bamboo leaf for ms cwang via www.boredpanda.com)

It was too hot for New York City; too hot for Stanford University. But a controversial, imposing sculpture by renowned international artist Dennis Oppenheim finally found a public home in laid-back Vancouver.

A country church is seen balancing on it’s steeple, as if it had been lifted by a terrific force and brought to the site as a device or method of rooting out evil forces.

(Update: In 2008 it was moved from Vancouver to Calgary, AB, Canada)

4. Chapel of St. Gildas (Brittany, France)

(Bamboo leaf for TouringBoy via www.boredpanda.com)

Mads: “This is the chapel of St-Gildas, which sits upon the bank of the Canal du Blavet in Brittany, France. “Built like a stone barn into the base of a bare rocky cliff, this was once a holy place of the Druids. Gildas appears to have travelled widely throughout the Celtic world of Corwall, Wales, Ireland and Scotland. He arrived in Brittany in about AD 540 and is said to have preached Christianity to the people from a rough pulpit, now contained within the chapel.” (from ‘Cruising French Waterways’ by Hugh McKnight p.150)

5. Shell Church (Huntington Beach, CA, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for woolennium via www.boredpanda.com)

Panda has no info on this one, only the location – Huntington Beach, CA, USA. The best thing about this church is a huge Shell logo.

6. Notre Dame du Haut (Ronchamp, France)

(Bamboo leaf for jimgrant via www.boredpanda.com)

People say that the roof of this building looks like Elvis’ hair and Panda agree.

Informally known as Ronchamp, the chapel of Notre Dame du Haut was completed in 1954 and is considered one of the finest examples of architecture by the late French/Swiss architect Le Corbusier.

Interesting fact: when it rains, water pours off the slanted roof onto a fountain, creating a dramatic waterfall.

More info: Notre Dame du Haut

7. St Joseph Ukrainian Catholic Church (Chicago, IL, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for GiantGinkgo via www.boredpanda.com)

I don’t want to tell what kind of thing those domes remind me. Its massiveness and gray color looks like Soviet architecture. I was amazed when I read that it was actually in USA and not in Soviet Union.

St. Joseph Ukrainian Catholic church is best known for its ultra-modern thirteen gold domed roof symbolizing the twelve apostles and Jesus Christ as the largest center dome.

It is celebrating its 53 years, so it was built in 1956 (if my calculations are right).

More info: St Joseph Ukrainian Church

8. Jubilee Church (Rome, Italy)

(Bamboo leaf for alaninabox via www.boredpanda.com)

Jubilee Church has very distinctive curved walls which look like sails and serve the engineering purpose of minimizing thermal peak loads in the interior space.

The walls are made from a special cement, which contain titanium dioxide, so it destroys air pollution.

According to Borgarello “When the titanium dioxide absorbs ultraviolet light, it becomes powerfully reactive, breaking down pollutants that come in contact with the concrete.”

Architect: Richard Meier

Year: 1996

9. Grace Fellowship Baptist Church (Baltimore Road in Detroit, Michigan, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for Derek Farr (DetroitDerek) via www.boredpanda.com)

This weird building is actually a church. Once it was famous for being Detroit’s most beautiful Chinese-American restaurant. Later it closed down and became the Omega Baptist Church and then the Grace Fellowship Baptist Church. Located at 265 Baltimore, MD, USA.

10. Basilica de Higuey (Dominican Republic)

(Bamboo leaf for Fernando Rossi via www.boredpanda.com)

Basilica de Higuey, inaugurated on January 21, 1971, is one of the most respected monuments of the Dominican Republic. It was built by French architects, and is located in the city of Higuey, Dominican Republic.

Panda thinks it is actually a huge basket, and not a church.

11. Church in Stykkishólmskirkja (Iceland)

(Bamboo leaf for omarrun via www.boredpanda.com)

(Bamboo leaf for omarrun via www.boredpanda.com)

No, this is not an alien structure – it is another weird church in Iceland.

I’ve found two different versions about this church:

Version #1: “It was built in 1990 and the architect is Jón Haraldssyni”

Version #2: “The church in Stykkishólmskirkja was built in 1879. The new church was than built in 1980. The church has drawn much of detention by its look from the sea and from land. In 1939 Fransiskusystur (nuns) built a monestry, school and the church. They also built a hospital witch is still in use.”

12. St. Basil’s Cathedral (Moscow, Russia)

(Bamboo leaf for Lst1984 via www.boredpanda.com)

Cathedral of Saint Basil the Blessed was built in 1555 -1561 by Ivan IV (a.k.a Ivan the Terrible) to celebrate the capture of the Khanate of Kazan. The multi-tented church stands at the very heart of Moscow,the Red Square.

A legend says that Ivan had the architect,Postnik Yakovlev, blinded to prevent him from building a more magnificent building for anyone else. In fact, Postnik Yakovlev built a number of churches after Saint Basil’s.

Panda thinks that it may be huge lollypops and wants to taste it.

More info: Saint Basil’s Cathedral

13. Cathedral of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

(Bamboo leaf for Phillie Casablanka via www.boredpanda.com)

Cathedral of Rio de Janeiro was built between 1964 and 1979. Conical in form it has internal diameter of 96 meters (315 ft) and an overall height of 75 meters (246 ft).

The church has a standing-room capacity of 20,000 people.

Four rectilinear stained glass windows soar 64 meters (210 ft) from floor to ceiling.

Looks like a Pyramid of Egypt or Aztecs, doesn’t it?

14. Sagrada Familia (Barcelona, Spain)

(Bamboo leaf for Wolfgang Staudt via www.boredpanda.com)

Sagrada Família is a very massive Roman Catholic basilica under construction in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Construction began in 1882 and continues to this day. A very famous architect Antoni Gaudí worked on the project for over 40 years, devoting the last 15 years of his life entirely to this endeavor.

In the center there is going to be a tower of Jesus Christ, surmounted by a giant cross; the tower’s total height will be 170 m (557,7ft).

I have never seen anything as fabulous as this church!

More info: Wikipedia.

15. Paraportiani Church (Mykonos, Greece)

(Bamboo leaf for marceelgermain via www.boredpanda.com)

According to the author of the photo: “Paraportiani Church is one of the most famous architectural structures in Greece. Its name means secondary gate, because it was built on the site of one of the gates of the Medieval stone walls. Some parts of this beautiful church date from 1425 and the rest was built during the 16th and 17th centuries.”

16. Borgund Stave Church (Lærdal, Norway)

(Bamboo leaf for Wikipedia via www.boredpanda.com)

Stave churches may have been very usual all over medieval northwestern Europe but now you can only find them in Norway (that what Wikipedia says, but this is wrong)

Borgund stave church located in Borgund, Lærdal, Norway is the best preserved of Norway’s 28 extant stave churches. This wooden church, probably built in the end of the 12th century, has not changed structure or had a major reconstruction since the date it was built.

Interesting fact: the church is also featured as a Wonder for the Viking civilization in the video game Age of Empires II: The Age of Kings.

17. The Green church (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

(Bamboo leaf for Magda-50 via www.boredpanda.com)

Bamboo leaves!?! I want to climb into this church and sit here all day.

The only info I managed to find: “a parish church in Buenos Aires, Argentina known as the “Huerto de Olivos”, or “Garden of Olives” – Michael

18. Church Ruins (Goreme, Turkey)

(Bamboo leaf for shapeshift via www.boredpanda.com)

The rock cut ruins of a church by persecuted Christians. Not sure when it was built, but definitely look very ancient. How did those guys carved the inside of these rocks?

The Cappadocia valley, where this church stands, is very popular for its rocks that the people of the villages at the heart of the Cappadocia Region carved out to form houses, churches, monasteries.

There are an estimated 150 churches and several monasteries in the canyon between the villages of Ihlara and Selime.

Those rocks are volcanic deposits, so that means they are soft rocks, making it possible to carve such structures.

19. Duomo, Milan Cathedral (Milan, Italy)

(Bamboo leaf for Stuck in Customs via www.boredpanda.com)

Mark Twain once said the following of the Duomo in Milan in his work, Innocents Abroad:

“They say that the Cathedral of Milan is second only to St. Peter’s at Rome. I cannot understand how it can be second to anything made by human hands.”

More info: Wikipedia.

20. Paoay Church a.k.a St. Augustine Parish (Philippines)

(Bamboo leaf for Storm Crypt via www.boredpanda.com)

Paoay Church reminds me of Aztec architecture. It looks very massive and strong. The walls of the church are 1.67 meters thick and are supported by 24 carved and massive buttresses.

Its construction started in 1704 and was completed in 1894 by the Augustinian friars led by Fr. Antonio Estavillo. It is said, that Its construction primarily was intended to withstand earthquakes. And it could test the strength of the walls very soon, because the church was damaged by an earthquake in 1706 and 1927.

The design of the church is a mixture of Gothic, Oriental and Baroque influence.

21. Cathedral of Brasilia (Brasilia, Brazil)

(Bamboo leaf for = xAv = via www.boredpanda.com)

(Bamboo leaf for Victor Soares, Agência Brazil via www.boredpanda.com)

 

This is a very famous Cathedral of Brasília designed by Oscar Niemeyer. Panda finds It modern but somehow childish. These columns, having hyperbolic section and weighing 90 t, represent two hands moving upwards to heaven.

The construction was finished in 1970.

More info: Cathedral of Brasília

22. St. Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery (Kiev, Ukraine)

(Bamboo leaf for EugeniusD80 via www.boredpanda.com)

St. Michael’s Golden-Domed Monastery is a functioning monastery in Kiev, Ukraine. The monastery is located on the Western side of the Dnieper River on the edge of a bluff northeast of the St. Sophia Cathedral. The site is located in the historic and administrative Uppertown and overlooks the city’s historical commercial and merchant quarter, the Podil neighbourhood.

Originally built in the Middle Ages by Sviatopolk II Iziaslavych, the monastery comprises the Cathedral itself (Mykhaylivs’kyi zolotoverkhyi sobor), the refectory of St. John the Divine, built in 1713, the Economic Gates (Ekonomichna vrata), constructed in 1760 and the monastery’s bell tower, which was added circa 1716–1719. The exterior of the structure was rebuilt in the Ukrainian Baroque style in the 18th century while the interior remained in its original Byzantine style. The cathedral was demolished by the Soviet authorities in the 1930s, but was recently reconstructed after Ukraine gained its independence.

More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Michael’s_Golden-Domed_Monastery

23. Church in a Hill (Luxembourg)

(Bamboo leaf for Martin LaBar (going on hiatus) via www.boredpanda.com)

This church is built into the hillside on which it perches. One of the reasons the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg has survived as an independent state for a thousand years against such powerful neighbors as Germany and France, is that the area is eminently fortifiable.

24. San Francisco de Asis Church (Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico)

(Bamboo leaf for longhorndave via www.boredpanda.com)

San Francisco de Asis Church is a small mission in Ranchos de Taos, New Mexico. Construction on the church began around 1772 and was completed in 1815 by Franciscan Fathers and its patron is Saint Francis of Assisi. It is made of adobe as are many of the Spanish missions in New Mexico. It a few miles south of Taos Pueblo and has inspired among the greatest number of depictions of any building in the United States. It was the subject of four paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe,and photographs by Ansel Adams and Paul Strand. Georgia O’Keeffe described it as “one of the most beautiful buildings left in the United States by the early Spaniards.”

25. Pilgrimage Church(Neviges, Germany)

(Bamboo leaf for seier+seier+seier via www.boredpanda.com)

Pilgrimage church designed by Gottfried Böhm and constructed during the period of 1963-1972. The sunken cathedral in autumn colors. Böhm used the terrain to lessen the impact of the enormous church on its small scale context.

26. Church with an A (Madrid, Spain)

(Bamboo leaf for R.Duran via www.boredpanda.com)

A Parish Church at the beginning of Alcalde Sainz de Baranda St. (Madrid, Spain).

27. Mr. Eko’s Church (The Island, near the beach camp)

(Bamboo leaf for Stillframe via www.boredpanda.com)

Architects: Eko and Charlie. Built in the 3rd season of Lost series.

28. Grundtvig’s Church, (Copenhagen, Denmark)

(Bamboo leaf for seier+seier+seier via www.boredpanda.com)

Grundtvig’s Church (Danish: Grundtvigs Kirke) is located in the Bispebjerg district of Copenhagen, Denmark. It is a rare example of expressionist church architecture. Due to its unusual appearance, it is one of the best known churches in the city.

29. Catholic Church (Uruguay, South America)

(Bamboo leaf for Pablo Lambrechts)

30. The Felsenkirche a.k.a. Church of the Rock, (Idar-Oberstein, Germany).

(Bamboo leaf for only_point five via www.boredpanda.com)

The Felsenkirche (“Church of the Rock”), a church built into a natural niche in the rocks, rises high above the houses of Oberstein. Nicely blends into the mountain, making all this place magical.

31. Don Justo’s Self Built Cathedral (Mejorada del Campo near Madrid, Spain)

(Bamboo leaf for www.citynoise.org via www.boredpanda.com)

“Justo Gallego Martínez is building his very own Cathedral in Mejorada del Campo near Madrid, Spain

This is no “model” cathedral and he is neither a qualified architect, nor engineer, nor bricklayer — he is a farmer. “The plans have only ever existed in my head” and have evolved over time in response to opportunity and inspiration. Nor does he have formal planning permission from the authorities of Mejorada del Campo — the town in which it is located (20 km from Madrid under the flight-path to the Barajas airport).

He has financed his work by rent from some inherited farmland — some of which he has already sold. Donations from supporters and visitors are welcomed.

The columns are moulded using old petrol drums, the window arches carry the marks of the tires they were moulded in and bicycle wheels have been used as pulleys.”

More info: http://www.citynoise.org/article/732

32. Cathedral of Maringa (Parana, Brazil)

(Bamboo leaf for carlosoliveerareis via www.boredpanda.com)

(Bamboo leaf for maria clara de melo)

This is a Roman Catholic cathedral located in downtown Maringá, Paraná, Brazil, measuring 124 m high. It was completed in 1972 and is the tallest church in South America and the 16th tallest in the world.

Architect José Augusto Bellucci was inspired by the Soviet sputnik satellites when he projected the modern design with conical shape of the cathedral, which was idealized by the archbishop Dom Jaime Luiz Coelho.

33. Salt Cathedral of Zipaquira, (Cundinamarca, Colombia)

(Bamboo leaf for -nidyarincon@hotmail.com)

(Bamboo leaf for jeromesutter and olliethebastard via www.boredpanda.com)

Catedral de Sal (Salt Cathedral) in Zipaquirá, about 25 miles north of Bogotá, is an underground church built in a tunnel of salt mines deep inside a salt mountain. It is built into a space left by salt mining; everything you see here is salt. As you descend into the church, you pass 14 small chapels representing the stations of the suffering of Christ. The sanctuary at the bottom has three sections, representing the birth, life, and death of Jesus.

The first Salt Cathedral was consecrated in 1954, but structural problems and safety concerns led the authorities to shut down the sanctuary in 1990. The current church was built between 1991 and 1996 about 200 feet below the old sanctuary, again using caves left behind by previous mining operations.

34. Bruder Klaus Chapel (Mechernich, southern Germany)

(Bamboo leaf for Florian Seiffert (F*) via www.boredpanda.com)

“A concrete chapel on the edge of a field in Mechernich, southern Germany, built by local farmers in honor of their patron saint, the 15th-century hermit Bruder Klaus” according to icon.

35. Written Stone (Monastery, Romania)

(Bamboo leaf for Daria Xenopo via www.boredpanda.com)

Local tradition confesses that,during the construction of a railway , at the opening of the a tunnel, it was found an icon painted in stone representing the Holy Trinity. The monastery was built at the opening of the tunnel The monastery was built at the opening of the tunnel on the rock.

36. Church of St. George(Lalibela, Ethiopia)

(Bamboo leaf for Dylan Cerling via www.boredpanda.com)

Possibly the most famous of Lalibeli’s churches, the Church of St. George is completely carved out of stone in the shape of a cross.

37. Trendsetters Church (Phoenix, AZ, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for Scott Bruce via www.boredpanda.com)

Trendsetters Church in Phoenix, AZ, built in 1973 by Neil Frisby as Capstone Cathedral. I’m sure Neil Frisby visited Egypt just before designing this church.

38. Chapel in the Rock (Arizona, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for santanartist via www.boredpanda.com)

This facinating Roman Catholic church is literally built into the rock. The views from outside are unbelievable but the serenity inside is awesome

Some say, that Chapel in the Rock can move even the non-religious.

39. The Wireman Chapel at Eckerd College (St. Petersburg, Florida, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for Eckwriter via www.boredpanda.com)

A kid on the tour to Eckerd College once said it looked like a “Jesus spider from outer space.” Inspired by 20th-century architect Eero Saarinen, the Chapel was designed by the highly respected Chicago architectural firm of Perkins and Will. Its key design features are its octagonal shape and in-the-round seating, the oculus at the center of the roof that directs sunlight to the center of the sanctuary, the lower glass panels which reflect light from the water outside to the interior, and the girders which recall the flying buttresses of the medieval cathedral, instilling a sense of timelessness in a contemporary structure.

40. Saint-Michel d’Aiguilhe chapel (Le Puy-en-Velay, France)

(Bamboo leaf for Sacred Destinations via www.boredpanda.com)

Perhaps one of the most remarkable sights in France, a chapel perched on a volcanic plug. This is the Rock of Aiguilhe, on the edge of the town of Puy en Velay, in the Auvergne. The Chapelle Saint-Michel has stood there for 1042 years, since Bishop Gothescalk had it built in 962 on his return from a pilgrimage to Santiago del Compostella in Galicia. In 1955 workers found relics under the alter that had been there since it was built.

41.Santuario Madonna della Lacrime (Sicily, Italy)

(Bamboo leaf for sammito antoine via www.boredpanda.com)

More info: http://www.madonnadellelacrime.it/eng_santuario.asp

43.The Hermitage(Island of San Juan de Gaztelugatxe, Spain)

(Bamboo leaf for Azrael Keroak via www.boredpanda.com)

The small church, which is usually closed, dates from the 10th century and seems to have come from the Knights Templar. In the year 1053 it was donated, by don Iñigo López Lord of Biscay, to the monastery of San Juan de la Peña near Jaca in Huesca. Medieval burials from the 9th and 12th centuries have been found on the esplanade and in the hermitage.

In 1593 it was attacked and sacked by Francis Drake. Among other incidents, it has caught fire several times. On the November 10, 1978, it was destroyed in one such fire. Two years later, on June 24, 1980 it was reinaugurated. The hermitage belongs to the parish of San Pelayo in Bakio.

The hermitage also houses various votive offerings from sailors who survived shipwrecks.

More info: Wikipedia

44. Church of Arbore (Suceava County, Romania)

(Bamboo leaf for cacalin via www.boredpanda.com)

The church of Arbore is dedicated to Saint John the Baptist. Its painted church was the first Moldavian painted church to be included on the UNESCO World Heritage List. The monastery and the commune are named after the boyar Luca Arbore who built the church in 1503. The erection of the church was completed in about 5 months. Its exterior paintings date from 1541 and were made by DragoÅŸ Coman. Painting the church took about 40 years.

More info:Wikipedia

45.The Chapel on the Rock (Allenspark, Colorado, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for jc/pics via www.boredpanda.com)

The founder of Camp St. Malo, Monsignor Joseph Bosetti, had for years entertained an idea that one day he would build a chapel on this site. In 1916 he and two friends observed a falling meteor during the night and in his search for the remnants the next morning, he came across a large rock. The beauty of the land inspired the priest and he remembered Jesus’ words to Peter: “Upon this rock, I will build my Church.” (Matt 16:18).

Vowing one day to build a chapel here, Msgr. Bosetti prayed for nearly 20 years to acquire the funds. During time, he found himself in a constant battle with the Colorado Highway department which had plans to dynamite the enormous piece of granite to both widen and straighten the curve in the road.

Eventually, Msgr. Bosetti won the battle and years later, when the chapel became a reality, it was reported that a group of engineers who laid out the road came to the dedication and thanked him for his perseverance.

The chapel was designed by noted Denver architect Jacques Benedict.

In 1993, Pope John Paul II visited the chapel during his trip to Denver for the World Youth Day and bestowed his personal blessing on the chapel.

More info: http://www.saintmalo.org/chapel.htm

46. Cadet Chapel (Air Force Academy, Colorado, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for Jeff Maurone via www.boredpanda.com)

The United States Air Force Academy Cadet Chapel, completed in 1962, is the distinguishing feature of the Cadet Area at the United States Air Force Academy. It was designed by renowned architect Walter Netsch of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill of Chicago. Originally controversial in its design, the Cadet Chapel has become a classic and highly regarded example of modernist architecture. The Cadet Chapel was awarded the American Institute of Architects’ National 25 Year Award in 1996, and as part of the Cadet Area, was named a U.S. National Historic Landmark in 2004.

More info: Wikipedia

47.St. Augustine Church (Brookland, Kent, UK)

(Bamboo leaf for kcm76 via www.boredpanda.com)

“Yes the late 12th century, wooden, bell tower is separate from the rest of the church! Apparently it is the only one of its size and shape in the country. Originally it was open to the elements the cladding being addedin the 15th century. You almost can’t take a picture of this lovely church without getting that litter bin or telephone wires (or both) in frame; the litter bin is even in all the guide books!” – kcm76

More info: here

48.Third Church of Christ, Scientist (Washington, DC, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for rodeomilano via www.boredpanda.com)

“This building is not only hideous but it is unwelcoming and, as anyone who has seen the J. Edgar Hoover Building would agree, it is extremely difficult and expensive to maintain. It does place undue monetary restrictions on how the church can serve the city because the church has to sink so much into the maintenance of the building.” (districtdiaries.blogspot.com)

Homepage: thirdchurchdc.org

49.Thorncrown Chapel (Eureka Springs, AR, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for www.thorncrown.com via www.boredpanda.com)

“Just outside Eureka Springs in the Arkansas Ozarks–itself a divine place–lies this small, peaceful, non-denominational chapel. Even as I feel the distance between the organized religion I was raised with and myself grow, places like this remind me of why the underlying faith meant and continues to mean so much to me.

Designed by E. Fay Jones in 1979, completed in July 1980.” Clinton Steeds

More info: http://www.thorncrown.com/

50. Church Birdhouse (Greer, South Carolina, USA)

(Bamboo leaf for Martin LaBar (going on hiatus) via www.boredpanda.com)

A colorful birdhouse, made in the shape of a church, hanging on a fence of someones yard in Greer, South Carolina. The bird living in this church must be a bird-priest raising donations from other birds in a form of seeds.

(source: Bored Panda.com)

Guess what is it (find answer here)

report

Read more: http://www.boredpanda.com/50-most-extraordinary-churches-of-the-world/

Playstation-4-sales

Like Logan Walker in Call of Duty: Ghosts, Sony’s eighth-generation console, the PlayStation 4, has come out of the gates swinging to accomplish a mission. That mission? Getting into as many gamers’ hands as possible — and as quickly as possible.

In the first 24 hours since the $400 PS4 was released on Friday, Sony sold 1 million consoles in the United States and Canada, the company announced Sunday.

“PS4 was designed with an unwavering commitment to gamers, and we are thrilled that consumer reaction has been so phenomenal,” Andrew House, president of Sony Computer Entertainment, said in a statement. “Sales remain very strong in North America, and we expect continued enthusiasm as we launch the PlayStation 4 in Europe and Latin America on Nov. 29.”

Thousands of gamers waited in line to purchase the PS4 at various midnight launch events across North America on Friday, including at the The Standard in New York City, where Sony unveiled game teaser trailers for Uncharted and Destiny.

Despite favorable sales figures and positive reviews, however, some PS4 buyers are reporting that their consoles are defective.

1. Ashley Spinelli from Disney’s Recess

Disney

Disney

 

Why she was a hero: Spinelli was a tough tomboy who refused to take shit from anybody. She didn’t want to be associated with the group of mean girls known as The Ashleys, so she shed her first name altogether, showing kids the power of reinvention, self identity, and paving your own path in life. Spinelli was sort of a childhood stepping stone to idolizing Jane from Daria.

2. Helga Pataki from Nickelodeon’s Hey Arnold!

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a (tragic) hero: No other character in the ’90s truly understood the ache of secret, unrequited love the way poor Helga Pataki did. Every LGBT kid struggles with crushin’ on someone who won’t like them back at some point, and the urge to go full Helga-style stalker is something most of us are still trying to avoid.

3. Usagi/Serena Tsukino from Toei’s Sailor Moon

Toei Animation

Why she was a hero: Long before the introduction of queer superheroes like Batwoman, there were the Sailor Scouts. Sailor Moon was a champion of love, equality, justice, and cute outfits. Though the American translation of the original Japanese cartoon altered a ton of storylines, the show featured numerous gay, lesbian, and genderqueer characters, both good and evil. Of note were the Sailor Starlights, who were men in civilian form and transformed into women to battle evil.

4. Angelica Pickles from Nickelodeon’s Rugrats

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Sure, she was sort of a vicious bully, but Angelica was also a crafty mastermind. She knew what she wanted and she went for it, and she wasn’t about to let any dumb babies get in her way. She was basically the prototype for Jane Lynch’s Coach Sue Sylvester.

5. Doug Funny from Nickelodeon’s Doug

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why he was a hero: Doug was constantly fantasizing about being someone else (a superhero, a musician, a spy) which is something a lot of LGBT kids do when things get rough. Even though Doug was shy and insecure, he was enormously caring and sensitive. Doug was a great role model, even if he dressed like a grandpa—sweater vest over a short sleeve half turtleneck? Girl.

6. Judy Funny from Nickelodeon’s Doug

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: In contrast to her brother, Judy was the epitome of cool. Most kiddos watching Doug couldn’t fully appreciate Judy’s brand of ostentatious snark, but she absolutely left an impression on a generation of sarcastic queer 20-somethings with Tumblrs. Plus, she was rockin’ the half-shaved head thing literally decades before Cassie picked up a pair of buzzers.

7. Spongebob and Patrick from Nickelodeon’s Spongebob Squarepants

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why they were heroes: Series creator Stephen Hillenburg claims that Spongebob and Patrick aren’t gay, but it’s pretty obvious they’re loving and supportive partners. In the episode “Rock-a-Bye Bivalve,” the duo adopt a baby scallop, which they name Junior. It was a pretty obvious depiction of gay parenthood and showed kids that LGBT individuals can form healthy family units like anyone else.

8. Prince Adam/He-Man from Mattel’s Masters of the Universe

Mattel

Mattel

Mattel

 

Why he was a hero: First of all, He-Man was thinly veiled propaganda to get kids interested in leather BDSM culture. And hey, that’s cool. Different strokes for different folks. Moreover, He-Man and villain Skeletor’s rivalry was actually a tragic gay love story.

9. Alexandra Mack from Nickelodeon’s The Secret World of Alex Mack

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Alex Mack went through a massive change as a teenager and subsequently had to struggle with being an outsider and coming to terms with who she was. Sound familiar? Her awkward reveal of her powers to her parents in the series’ finale mirrored the future coming out stories of many LGBT kids, even if they couldn’t make the connection quite yet.

10. Gloria, Iggy, and Jacob from CBC’s Under the Umbrella Tree

CBC

CBC

CBC

 

Why they were heroes: Under the Umbrella Tree was the original Modern Family, teaching little ones that families come in all shapes and sizes. Kids had their pick of who to look up to: Gloria was a theatrical tomboy, Jacob was sensitive and creative, and Iggy was a cocky, competitive jock. If there were a Grindr app for iguanas, you know Iggy would be all up on that today.

11. Pepper Ann from Disney’s Pepper Ann

Disney / ABC

Disney / ABC

 

Why she was a hero: Pepper “Too Cool To Be Twelve” Ann was an emotional, nerdy weirdo, but she refused to let that cause her turmoil. The show’s theme song said it all: she marched in her own parade, was much too cool for seventh grade, and she was her own biggest fan. A true call for personal acceptance if there ever was one.

12. Heffer Wolfe from Nickelodeon’s Rocko’s Modern Life

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why he was a hero: Heffer, a cow, grew up in a family of wolves, and was clearly the odd man out. And yet his family accepted him, even though the desire to eat him was a constant challenge. The important part is that they accepted him for being different, because love is love, even if you’re a cow.

13. Nona F. Mecklenberg from Nickelodeon’s Adventures of Pete and Pete

Nickelodeon / youtube.com

Why she was a hero: Little Pete’s best friend was the ultimate badass and a true individual. Her arm cast was always decorated with “Make It Work” flair long before the phrase ever passed from Tim Gunn’s lips. In the ’90s, little queer girls wanted to be her and little queer boys also wanted to be her. Because she was incredible.

14. Demona from Disney’s Gargoyles

 

Why she was a hero badass villain: Demona hated humans for treating her kind like an outcast and would stop at nothing to destroy them all. Fantasizing about revenge is something that crossed a lot of LGBT kids’ minds, even if they’d never resort to total annihilation. Thankfully they had Demona to live through vicariously.

15. Ma-Ti from Hanna-Barbera’s Captain Planet and the Planeteers

Hanna Barbera / Via funnyordie.com

Why he was a hero: Straight up, Ma-Ti had the lamest power of all the Planeteers. While his friends could could control fire, water, wind, and the earth, Ma-Ti’s power was heart, meaning he always seemed like an outcast even in his own clique. Still, he was a vital part of the group—his power was necessary to summon Captain Planet. What’s a rainbow without every color? You go, Ma-Ti.

16. Red from Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock

Jim Henson / Via muppet.wikia.com

Why she was a hero: Red was definitely the Peppermint Patty of the Fraggles’ underground world: exuberant, sassy, and athletic. She was also completely fearless—she was a redhead who dared to wear red and she made it work. *Snaps*

17. Oblina from Nickelodeon’s Aaahh!!! Real Monsters

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Oblina was essentially the Hermione Granger of her deformed monster group, and she always sort of seemed like she took style cues from ’80s drag queens. LGBT kids could look up to her because although she was strange and awkward, she was highly intelligent and confident in her abilites.

18. Clarissa Marie Darling from Nickelodeon’s Clarissa Explains It All

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Why wasn’t she a hero? Her fashion sense was on point, she was quirky for days, and she taught herself to code video games on her computer. Clarissa was adventurous and dangerous and single-handedly instilled courage in a generation of gaybies.

19. Johnny Bravo from Cartoon Network’s Johnny Bravo

 

Why he was a hero: Because he looked amazing in a black t-shirt, and even better without one.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/adamellis/kids-show-characters-who-were-totally-gay-heroes


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

Lee Jeffries career began as a sports photographer, capturing the beautiful game of football in Manchester. Then a chance meeting with a homeless woman living in the streets of London changed his life forever. He has since dedicated himself to capturing gripping portraits of the disenfranchised.

Shooting exclusively in black and white, Lee Jeffries’ 135+ pictures can be viewed in his Flickr Photostream. The majority are closeup portraits with incredible detail. Each photograph exudes so much raw character and depth, you find yourself studying each shot with great intensity. Below is a sample of his large collection, the Sifter strongly recommends you check out his entire set on Flickr.

2.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

3.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

4.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

5.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

 

BLACK AND WHITE PORTRAITS OF THE HOMELESS – LEE JEFFRIES

 
Lee Jeffries lives in Manchester in the United Kingdom. Close to the professional football circle, this artist starts to photograph sporting events. A chance meeting with a young homeless girl in the streets of London changes his artistic approach forever.

Lee Jeffries recalls that, initially, he had stolen a photo from this young homeless girl huddled in a sleeping bag. The photographer knew that the young girl had noticed him but his first reaction was to leave. He says that something made him stay and go and discuss with the homeless girl. His perception about the homeless completely changes. They become the subject of his art.

The models in his photographs are homeless people that he has met in Europe and in the United States: «Situations arose, and I made an effort to learn to get to know each of the subjects before asking their permission to do their portrait.» From then onwards, his photographs portray his convictions and his compassion to the world. [Source: YellowKorner.com]

6.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

7.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

8.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

9.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

10.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

11.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

12.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

13.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

14.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

15.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

// <![CDATA[
google_ad_client = "pub-0503540791085756";
/* 728×90 leader */
google_ad_slot = "2538919307";
google_ad_width = 728;
google_ad_height = 90;
// ]]>
// <![CDATA[

// ]]>

16.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

17.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

18.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

19.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

20.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

21.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

22.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

23.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

24.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

25.


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

If you enjoyed this article, the Sifter highly recommends:

 
Honoring the Veterans of World War II [25 pics]

Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/2011/08/black-white-portraits-of-homeless-by-lee-jeffries/

http://twitter.com/#!/RealBradWesley/status/527800531117682688

Lena Dunham, author of the new book “Not That Kind of Girl” and star/producer of HBO’s “Girls,” teamed up with Planned Parenthood to help raise money for the abortion provider’s political action fund with this Dunham-designed “Special Signature edition T-shirt.”

There’s really a market for celebrity-endorsed abortion fashion wear? Who knew…

Anyway, Dunham then enlisted the help of some of her Hollywood actress pals to help sell the shirt, posting photos of the women wearing the shirts to her Instagram account. Take a look:

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-c8a0d7f6ca5b4d4de04ab5a2f825ec2b-5453b1f4b4744’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-c8a0d7f6ca5b4d4de04ab5a2f825ec2b-5453b1f4b4744’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-c8a0d7f6ca5b4d4de04ab5a2f825ec2b-5453b1f4b4744’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-d2b240e4fc873d4e9da7917899cef4a7-5453b1f4b500c’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-d2b240e4fc873d4e9da7917899cef4a7-5453b1f4b500c’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-d2b240e4fc873d4e9da7917899cef4a7-5453b1f4b500c’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-f22394b9749ca03d178b87b14dfecbe0-5453b1f4b5b9b’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-f22394b9749ca03d178b87b14dfecbe0-5453b1f4b5b9b’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-f22394b9749ca03d178b87b14dfecbe0-5453b1f4b5b9b’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-84b9c1076c03c8bd7719a94c171bb179-5453b1f4b691d’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-84b9c1076c03c8bd7719a94c171bb179-5453b1f4b691d’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-84b9c1076c03c8bd7719a94c171bb179-5453b1f4b691d’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-b64be0f827b57c6312860e357fae67f1-5453b1f4b7b39’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-b64be0f827b57c6312860e357fae67f1-5453b1f4b7b39’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-b64be0f827b57c6312860e357fae67f1-5453b1f4b7b39’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-f99cabd2a4055564ff6ab257ccd44336-5453b1f4b8ba7’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-f99cabd2a4055564ff6ab257ccd44336-5453b1f4b8ba7’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-f99cabd2a4055564ff6ab257ccd44336-5453b1f4b8ba7’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-985e2da86fdfe3861d70472d90fa0ff6-5453b1f4b9a34’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-985e2da86fdfe3861d70472d90fa0ff6-5453b1f4b9a34’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-985e2da86fdfe3861d70472d90fa0ff6-5453b1f4b9a34’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-dbb3c6c6028db15aa31ac400c5032ee0-5453b1f4ba0fc’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-dbb3c6c6028db15aa31ac400c5032ee0-5453b1f4ba0fc’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-dbb3c6c6028db15aa31ac400c5032ee0-5453b1f4ba0fc’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-bce504a011e074bead98d0b130cbe302-5453b1f4ba7df’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-bce504a011e074bead98d0b130cbe302-5453b1f4ba7df’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-bce504a011e074bead98d0b130cbe302-5453b1f4ba7df’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-4929e56244007e8909063204d61c11ff-5453b1f4bb01b’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-4929e56244007e8909063204d61c11ff-5453b1f4bb01b’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-4929e56244007e8909063204d61c11ff-5453b1f4bb01b’
}, window.location.protocol + ‘//wpcomwidgets.com’ );
}
}

// Autosize iframe
var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) {
var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ );
origin.href = e.origin;

// Verify message origin
if ( ‘wpcomwidgets.com’ !== origin.host )
return;

// Verify message is in a format we expect
if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type )
return;

switch ( e.data.msg_type ) {
case ‘poll_size:response’:
var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id );

if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width )
iframe.width = ‘100%’;
if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height )
iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height );

return;
default:
return;
}
}

if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) {
window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false );
} else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) {
window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse );
}
}
if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ }
else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); }
else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); }
} )();

***

( function() {
var func = function() {
var iframe_form = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-form-82eb72ef0ff33e90829f6e9f3a28381e-5453b1f4bb83c’);
var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-82eb72ef0ff33e90829f6e9f3a28381e-5453b1f4bb83c’);
if ( iframe_form && iframe ) {
iframe_form.submit();
iframe.onload = function() {
iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( {
‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’,
‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-82eb72ef0ff33e90829f6e9f3a28381e-5453b1f4bb83c’
}, win

Read more: http://twitchy.com/2014/10/31/11-celebrities-who-heart-abortion-photos/

The Nobel prize for peace. It is a controversial award having been granted to many who seemingly don’t deserve it, and not granted to those who do. This list looks at ten people who were robbed of the prize.

Irena Sendler Vlrg 8Awidec

Irena Sendler was a Polish Catholic who died in 2008. From 1939 to 1945, she personally saved the lives of 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto. She forged identification papers, passports, sheltered them in children’s homes throughout Warsaw.

The Gestapo caught her in 1943 and severely tortured her for the location of the Jews she had extricated from the Ghetto. She refused to give them up. She was sentenced to death and saved by a bribe to the Nazi officer in charge, who simply left her in deep in a forest with all four limbs broken.

She recovered and went right back to work saving Jews from the Ghetto. She was nominated in 2007, but was passed over in favor of Al Gore. She was 98 when she died.

Gandhi And Indira-1

Mohandas Gandhi was murdered in 1948. He began his work for Indian independence from Britain in 1916 and finally succeeded in 1947, when Louis Mountbatten relinquished India from Britain to the Indians. One man, by himself, Gandhi has been credited with defeating the British Empire singlehandedly, without raising one finger in violence.

He was nominated in 5 years, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1947, and 1948. 19 people nominated him in those years, especially Ole Colbjornsen, member of the Norwegian Parliament, who nominated him the first 3 times. In the years between 1939 and 1947, he was either not nominated by anyone, or the Swedish Academy refused to consider nominations during the War. Likewise, in the years preceding 1937, not one person on Earth nominated him.

A rule stipulates that death before being awarded the Prize renders one ineligible for it, nominated or not. But I think the Academy could have given it to him posthumously, and no one would have complained. In which case, they could still award it to him for the year 1948. He could certainly replace Cordell Hull, for 1945. Hull is mentioned on another Listverse list.

It is possible that his “experiments” with under-aged children (item 8) reduced his chances of receiving the prize, but as earlier stated, most people would probably not object to his having been awarded the prize despite them.

3302709845 F42D8070Ce-1

The head of the Edhi Foundation, based in Pakistan, he is a philanthropist, who in 1951 opened a small medical shop in Karachi, using his own meager funds, with the sole intention of helping anyone who came in. He had learned little about medicine, but wanted to help people. He claims that he does so because he enjoys it, in the same way that an evil man enjoys hurting people.

He has been treating everyone in the Karachi area, and all areas where his branches are located, over the whole world. He treats people at extremely low cost. He began the Edhi Foundation with donations from friends and supporters around Karachi, and the Foundation is a free maternity clinic and nursing school. Students may enroll at absolutely no cost. Tuition, books, and other equipment are free.

Karachi suffered a flu outbreak in 1957, and Edhi immediately set up tents in which he and his faculty treated everyone for free. He bought an ambulance with donations, which he personally drove to accidents, and to his own clinic, or to hospitals. The Edhi Foundation has a $10 million budget, but Edhi refuses to take any of the money for himself. As he is still alive, it is not entirely fair that he should be on this list, as he may win in the future. But I thought it fitting, given the recent 2009 Peace Prize, and the fact that he was considered for it also.

775F7620070430132640141

Jose Figueres Ferrer was the President of Costa Rica 3 times, and during his first term, he granted women the right to vote, stating that while men may be stronger, there is no difference between male and female mental faculties. He abolished his country’s army, arguing that only a police force is necessary for domestic law enforcement, and that an army only exists for the promise of invading another country; he did not believe any country around him wanted to invade Costa Rica.

After nationalizing Costa Rica’s banking and creating a welfare state, he outlawed Communism. Ferrer oversaw the writing of a new constitution, guaranteed state managed public education for every citizen, gave citizenship to the children of black immigrants, and established a civil service bureaucracy.

Hoandwife-2

He graduated from Munich University in 1932, and was appointed as a diplomatic secretary in Turkey, then in Vienna in 1937. The next year, Hitler annexed Austria, and Ho was promoted to Consul-General of the Chinese Embassy in Vienna.

After Kristallnacht, everyone in Austria knew full well the predicament facing the 200,000 Jews throughout the country. Their only hope was to escape from Europe, and this was possible only with exit visas. The Evian Conference of 1938 caused 38 countries to refuse Jews immigration, and Ho was ordered by Chen Jie, the Chinese ambassador to Berlin, not to provide visas for Jews.

Ho endangered himself for all six years of the War by refusing to obey this order. He issued 1906 visas by 27 October 1938, some for Jews, some not. How many Jews he saved will never be ascertained, but given that he issued almost 2,000 in only his first 6 months, he may have saved thousands of lives. Whoever saves one life saves the world entire. He was 96 when he died. He has been nicknamed “China’s Schindler.”

Cesar-Chavez

He has been called “the Mexican Martin Luther King.” He found working conditions appalling for common Latino laborers in California, and co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, which is now called United Farm Workers. He organized civil rights activism, and became the Community Service Organization’s national director in 1958. His efforts to gain higher wages and better working conditions for farm laborers finally succeeded in 1966.

After that, he fought to restrict illegal immigrants from entering the U. S. and taking jobs from legal Mexican citizens. His birthday is a state holiday in California. He died in 1993, and the next year was awarded the Medal of Freedom from Bill Clinton.

Biko Steve

After Nelson Mandela was imprisoned in 1964, Steve Biko became the primary authority of the anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa. He founded the Black Consciousness Movement and advocated a worldwide “brotherhood of man.”

He was the primary architect of the protests that reached a head at the Soweto Uprising in June, 1976. He preached non-violence, which was not entirely heeded, and the uprising resulted in Apartheid police slaughtering school children at random in the crowds.

They then targeted Biko and finally caught him, and beat him to death, from 11 September to 12 September, 1977.

06---Lentz---Dorothy-Day-Rgb

Dorothy Day (November 8, 1897 – November 29, 1980) was an American journalist, distributist, and devout Catholic convert. In the 1930s, Day worked closely with fellow activist Peter Maurin to establish the Catholic Worker movement, a nonviolent, pacifist, movement that continues to combine direct aid for the poor and homeless with nonviolent direct action on their behalf. A revered figure within segments of the U.S. Catholic community, Day is being considered for sainthood by the Catholic Church. Day has been the recipient of numerous posthumous honors and awards. Among them: in 1992, she received the Courage of Conscience Award from the Peace Abbey, and in 2001, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York.

Schindler1 Web

Oskar Schindler was the most famous member of the Avenue of the Righteous. He saved 1,200 Jews from the Nazis by employing them in his munitions factories from 1943 to the end of the War. He therefore placed himself in extreme mortal peril constantly during that time, as the Nazis knew full well that his workers were Jewish.

He was very persuasive, having paid millions to the Nazi Party up to that time, and insisted that his workers were more useful to the Wehrmacht by manufacturing pots, pans, and ammunition. But secretly, he had his workers sabotage the ammunition so it would not function.

453884308 Aae521Bb97

On April 28, 1935, four years before the War even started, Eugenio Pacelli (soon to become Pope Pius XII) gave a speech that aroused the attention of the world press. Speaking to an audience of 250,000 pilgrims in Lourdes, France, the future Pius XII stated that the Nazis “are in reality only miserable plagiarists who dress up old errors with new tinsel. It does not make any difference whether they flock to the banners of social revolution, whether they are guided by a false concept of the world and of life, or whether they are possessed by the superstition of a race and blood cult.” During the war (when Pacelli had become Pope) he spoke out strongly in defense of the Jews with the first mass arrests in 1943, and L’Osservatore Romano carried an article protesting the internment of Jews and the confiscation of their property. The Fascist press came to call the Vatican paper ‘a mouthpiece of the Jews.’

Prior to the Nazi invasion, the Pope had been working hard to get Jews out of Italy by emigration; he now was forced to turn his attention to finding them hiding places: “[t]he Pope sent out the order that religious buildings were to give refuge to Jews, even at the price of great personal sacrifice on the part of their occupants; he released monasteries and convents from the cloister rule forbidding entry into these religious houses to all but a few specified outsiders, so that they could be used as hiding places. Thousands of Jews — the figures run from 4,000 to 7,000 — were hidden, fed, clothed, and bedded in the 180 known places of refuge in Vatican City, churches and basilicas, Church administrative buildings, and parish houses. Unknown numbers of Jews were sheltered in Castel Gandolfo, the site of the Pope’s summer residence, private homes, hospitals, and nursing institutions; and the Pope took personal responsibility for the care of the children of Jews deported from Italy.”

The consequences of the actions of Venerable Pope Pius XII in defense of the Jews were such that the Chief Rabbi of Rome (Rabbi Zolli) during WWII converted to Catholicism and changed his name to Eugenio (out of reverence for the Pope). [Source]

Read more: http://listverse.com/2009/11/04/top-10-people-robbed-of-the-nobel-prize/