Playstation-4-sales

Like Logan Walker in Call of Duty: Ghosts, Sony’s eighth-generation console, the PlayStation 4, has come out of the gates swinging to accomplish a mission. That mission? Getting into as many gamers’ hands as possible — and as quickly as possible.

In the first 24 hours since the $400 PS4 was released on Friday, Sony sold 1 million consoles in the United States and Canada, the company announced Sunday.

“PS4 was designed with an unwavering commitment to gamers, and we are thrilled that consumer reaction has been so phenomenal,” Andrew House, president of Sony Computer Entertainment, said in a statement. “Sales remain very strong in North America, and we expect continued enthusiasm as we launch the PlayStation 4 in Europe and Latin America on Nov. 29.”

Thousands of gamers waited in line to purchase the PS4 at various midnight launch events across North America on Friday, including at the The Standard in New York City, where Sony unveiled game teaser trailers for Uncharted and Destiny.

Despite favorable sales figures and positive reviews, however, some PS4 buyers are reporting that their consoles are defective.

1. Ashley Spinelli from Disney’s Recess

Disney

Disney

 

Why she was a hero: Spinelli was a tough tomboy who refused to take shit from anybody. She didn’t want to be associated with the group of mean girls known as The Ashleys, so she shed her first name altogether, showing kids the power of reinvention, self identity, and paving your own path in life. Spinelli was sort of a childhood stepping stone to idolizing Jane from Daria.

2. Helga Pataki from Nickelodeon’s Hey Arnold!

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a (tragic) hero: No other character in the ’90s truly understood the ache of secret, unrequited love the way poor Helga Pataki did. Every LGBT kid struggles with crushin’ on someone who won’t like them back at some point, and the urge to go full Helga-style stalker is something most of us are still trying to avoid.

3. Usagi/Serena Tsukino from Toei’s Sailor Moon

Toei Animation

Why she was a hero: Long before the introduction of queer superheroes like Batwoman, there were the Sailor Scouts. Sailor Moon was a champion of love, equality, justice, and cute outfits. Though the American translation of the original Japanese cartoon altered a ton of storylines, the show featured numerous gay, lesbian, and genderqueer characters, both good and evil. Of note were the Sailor Starlights, who were men in civilian form and transformed into women to battle evil.

4. Angelica Pickles from Nickelodeon’s Rugrats

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Sure, she was sort of a vicious bully, but Angelica was also a crafty mastermind. She knew what she wanted and she went for it, and she wasn’t about to let any dumb babies get in her way. She was basically the prototype for Jane Lynch’s Coach Sue Sylvester.

5. Doug Funny from Nickelodeon’s Doug

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why he was a hero: Doug was constantly fantasizing about being someone else (a superhero, a musician, a spy) which is something a lot of LGBT kids do when things get rough. Even though Doug was shy and insecure, he was enormously caring and sensitive. Doug was a great role model, even if he dressed like a grandpa—sweater vest over a short sleeve half turtleneck? Girl.

6. Judy Funny from Nickelodeon’s Doug

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: In contrast to her brother, Judy was the epitome of cool. Most kiddos watching Doug couldn’t fully appreciate Judy’s brand of ostentatious snark, but she absolutely left an impression on a generation of sarcastic queer 20-somethings with Tumblrs. Plus, she was rockin’ the half-shaved head thing literally decades before Cassie picked up a pair of buzzers.

7. Spongebob and Patrick from Nickelodeon’s Spongebob Squarepants

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why they were heroes: Series creator Stephen Hillenburg claims that Spongebob and Patrick aren’t gay, but it’s pretty obvious they’re loving and supportive partners. In the episode “Rock-a-Bye Bivalve,” the duo adopt a baby scallop, which they name Junior. It was a pretty obvious depiction of gay parenthood and showed kids that LGBT individuals can form healthy family units like anyone else.

8. Prince Adam/He-Man from Mattel’s Masters of the Universe

Mattel

Mattel

Mattel

 

Why he was a hero: First of all, He-Man was thinly veiled propaganda to get kids interested in leather BDSM culture. And hey, that’s cool. Different strokes for different folks. Moreover, He-Man and villain Skeletor’s rivalry was actually a tragic gay love story.

9. Alexandra Mack from Nickelodeon’s The Secret World of Alex Mack

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Alex Mack went through a massive change as a teenager and subsequently had to struggle with being an outsider and coming to terms with who she was. Sound familiar? Her awkward reveal of her powers to her parents in the series’ finale mirrored the future coming out stories of many LGBT kids, even if they couldn’t make the connection quite yet.

10. Gloria, Iggy, and Jacob from CBC’s Under the Umbrella Tree

CBC

CBC

CBC

 

Why they were heroes: Under the Umbrella Tree was the original Modern Family, teaching little ones that families come in all shapes and sizes. Kids had their pick of who to look up to: Gloria was a theatrical tomboy, Jacob was sensitive and creative, and Iggy was a cocky, competitive jock. If there were a Grindr app for iguanas, you know Iggy would be all up on that today.

11. Pepper Ann from Disney’s Pepper Ann

Disney / ABC

Disney / ABC

 

Why she was a hero: Pepper “Too Cool To Be Twelve” Ann was an emotional, nerdy weirdo, but she refused to let that cause her turmoil. The show’s theme song said it all: she marched in her own parade, was much too cool for seventh grade, and she was her own biggest fan. A true call for personal acceptance if there ever was one.

12. Heffer Wolfe from Nickelodeon’s Rocko’s Modern Life

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why he was a hero: Heffer, a cow, grew up in a family of wolves, and was clearly the odd man out. And yet his family accepted him, even though the desire to eat him was a constant challenge. The important part is that they accepted him for being different, because love is love, even if you’re a cow.

13. Nona F. Mecklenberg from Nickelodeon’s Adventures of Pete and Pete

Nickelodeon / youtube.com

Why she was a hero: Little Pete’s best friend was the ultimate badass and a true individual. Her arm cast was always decorated with “Make It Work” flair long before the phrase ever passed from Tim Gunn’s lips. In the ’90s, little queer girls wanted to be her and little queer boys also wanted to be her. Because she was incredible.

14. Demona from Disney’s Gargoyles

 

Why she was a hero badass villain: Demona hated humans for treating her kind like an outcast and would stop at nothing to destroy them all. Fantasizing about revenge is something that crossed a lot of LGBT kids’ minds, even if they’d never resort to total annihilation. Thankfully they had Demona to live through vicariously.

15. Ma-Ti from Hanna-Barbera’s Captain Planet and the Planeteers

Hanna Barbera / Via funnyordie.com

Why he was a hero: Straight up, Ma-Ti had the lamest power of all the Planeteers. While his friends could could control fire, water, wind, and the earth, Ma-Ti’s power was heart, meaning he always seemed like an outcast even in his own clique. Still, he was a vital part of the group—his power was necessary to summon Captain Planet. What’s a rainbow without every color? You go, Ma-Ti.

16. Red from Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock

Jim Henson / Via muppet.wikia.com

Why she was a hero: Red was definitely the Peppermint Patty of the Fraggles’ underground world: exuberant, sassy, and athletic. She was also completely fearless—she was a redhead who dared to wear red and she made it work. *Snaps*

17. Oblina from Nickelodeon’s Aaahh!!! Real Monsters

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Oblina was essentially the Hermione Granger of her deformed monster group, and she always sort of seemed like she took style cues from ’80s drag queens. LGBT kids could look up to her because although she was strange and awkward, she was highly intelligent and confident in her abilites.

18. Clarissa Marie Darling from Nickelodeon’s Clarissa Explains It All

Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon

 

Why she was a hero: Why wasn’t she a hero? Her fashion sense was on point, she was quirky for days, and she taught herself to code video games on her computer. Clarissa was adventurous and dangerous and single-handedly instilled courage in a generation of gaybies.

19. Johnny Bravo from Cartoon Network’s Johnny Bravo

 

Why he was a hero: Because he looked amazing in a black t-shirt, and even better without one.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/adamellis/kids-show-characters-who-were-totally-gay-heroes


Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

Lee Jeffries career began as a sports photographer, capturing the beautiful game of football in Manchester. Then a chance meeting with a homeless woman living in the streets of London changed his life forever. He has since dedicated himself to capturing gripping portraits of the disenfranchised.

Shooting exclusively in black and white, Lee Jeffries’ 135+ pictures can be viewed in his Flickr Photostream. The majority are closeup portraits with incredible detail. Each photograph exudes so much raw character and depth, you find yourself studying each shot with great intensity. Below is a sample of his large collection, the Sifter strongly recommends you check out his entire set on Flickr.

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

 

BLACK AND WHITE PORTRAITS OF THE HOMELESS – LEE JEFFRIES

 
Lee Jeffries lives in Manchester in the United Kingdom. Close to the professional football circle, this artist starts to photograph sporting events. A chance meeting with a young homeless girl in the streets of London changes his artistic approach forever.

Lee Jeffries recalls that, initially, he had stolen a photo from this young homeless girl huddled in a sleeping bag. The photographer knew that the young girl had noticed him but his first reaction was to leave. He says that something made him stay and go and discuss with the homeless girl. His perception about the homeless completely changes. They become the subject of his art.

The models in his photographs are homeless people that he has met in Europe and in the United States: «Situations arose, and I made an effort to learn to get to know each of the subjects before asking their permission to do their portrait.» From then onwards, his photographs portray his convictions and his compassion to the world. [Source: YellowKorner.com]

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

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Photograph by LEE JEFFRIES

If you enjoyed this article, the Sifter highly recommends:

 
Honoring the Veterans of World War II [25 pics]

Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/2011/08/black-white-portraits-of-homeless-by-lee-jeffries/

http://twitter.com/#!/RealBradWesley/status/527800531117682688

Lena Dunham, author of the new book “Not That Kind of Girl” and star/producer of HBO’s “Girls,” teamed up with Planned Parenthood to help raise money for the abortion provider’s political action fund with this Dunham-designed “Special Signature edition T-shirt.”

There’s really a market for celebrity-endorsed abortion fashion wear? Who knew…

Anyway, Dunham then enlisted the help of some of her Hollywood actress pals to help sell the shirt, posting photos of the women wearing the shirts to her Instagram account. Take a look:

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Read more: http://twitchy.com/2014/10/31/11-celebrities-who-heart-abortion-photos/

The Nobel prize for peace. It is a controversial award having been granted to many who seemingly don’t deserve it, and not granted to those who do. This list looks at ten people who were robbed of the prize.

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Irena Sendler was a Polish Catholic who died in 2008. From 1939 to 1945, she personally saved the lives of 2,500 Jewish children from the Warsaw Ghetto. She forged identification papers, passports, sheltered them in children’s homes throughout Warsaw.

The Gestapo caught her in 1943 and severely tortured her for the location of the Jews she had extricated from the Ghetto. She refused to give them up. She was sentenced to death and saved by a bribe to the Nazi officer in charge, who simply left her in deep in a forest with all four limbs broken.

She recovered and went right back to work saving Jews from the Ghetto. She was nominated in 2007, but was passed over in favor of Al Gore. She was 98 when she died.

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Mohandas Gandhi was murdered in 1948. He began his work for Indian independence from Britain in 1916 and finally succeeded in 1947, when Louis Mountbatten relinquished India from Britain to the Indians. One man, by himself, Gandhi has been credited with defeating the British Empire singlehandedly, without raising one finger in violence.

He was nominated in 5 years, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1947, and 1948. 19 people nominated him in those years, especially Ole Colbjornsen, member of the Norwegian Parliament, who nominated him the first 3 times. In the years between 1939 and 1947, he was either not nominated by anyone, or the Swedish Academy refused to consider nominations during the War. Likewise, in the years preceding 1937, not one person on Earth nominated him.

A rule stipulates that death before being awarded the Prize renders one ineligible for it, nominated or not. But I think the Academy could have given it to him posthumously, and no one would have complained. In which case, they could still award it to him for the year 1948. He could certainly replace Cordell Hull, for 1945. Hull is mentioned on another Listverse list.

It is possible that his “experiments” with under-aged children (item 8) reduced his chances of receiving the prize, but as earlier stated, most people would probably not object to his having been awarded the prize despite them.

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The head of the Edhi Foundation, based in Pakistan, he is a philanthropist, who in 1951 opened a small medical shop in Karachi, using his own meager funds, with the sole intention of helping anyone who came in. He had learned little about medicine, but wanted to help people. He claims that he does so because he enjoys it, in the same way that an evil man enjoys hurting people.

He has been treating everyone in the Karachi area, and all areas where his branches are located, over the whole world. He treats people at extremely low cost. He began the Edhi Foundation with donations from friends and supporters around Karachi, and the Foundation is a free maternity clinic and nursing school. Students may enroll at absolutely no cost. Tuition, books, and other equipment are free.

Karachi suffered a flu outbreak in 1957, and Edhi immediately set up tents in which he and his faculty treated everyone for free. He bought an ambulance with donations, which he personally drove to accidents, and to his own clinic, or to hospitals. The Edhi Foundation has a $10 million budget, but Edhi refuses to take any of the money for himself. As he is still alive, it is not entirely fair that he should be on this list, as he may win in the future. But I thought it fitting, given the recent 2009 Peace Prize, and the fact that he was considered for it also.

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Jose Figueres Ferrer was the President of Costa Rica 3 times, and during his first term, he granted women the right to vote, stating that while men may be stronger, there is no difference between male and female mental faculties. He abolished his country’s army, arguing that only a police force is necessary for domestic law enforcement, and that an army only exists for the promise of invading another country; he did not believe any country around him wanted to invade Costa Rica.

After nationalizing Costa Rica’s banking and creating a welfare state, he outlawed Communism. Ferrer oversaw the writing of a new constitution, guaranteed state managed public education for every citizen, gave citizenship to the children of black immigrants, and established a civil service bureaucracy.

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He graduated from Munich University in 1932, and was appointed as a diplomatic secretary in Turkey, then in Vienna in 1937. The next year, Hitler annexed Austria, and Ho was promoted to Consul-General of the Chinese Embassy in Vienna.

After Kristallnacht, everyone in Austria knew full well the predicament facing the 200,000 Jews throughout the country. Their only hope was to escape from Europe, and this was possible only with exit visas. The Evian Conference of 1938 caused 38 countries to refuse Jews immigration, and Ho was ordered by Chen Jie, the Chinese ambassador to Berlin, not to provide visas for Jews.

Ho endangered himself for all six years of the War by refusing to obey this order. He issued 1906 visas by 27 October 1938, some for Jews, some not. How many Jews he saved will never be ascertained, but given that he issued almost 2,000 in only his first 6 months, he may have saved thousands of lives. Whoever saves one life saves the world entire. He was 96 when he died. He has been nicknamed “China’s Schindler.”

Cesar-Chavez

He has been called “the Mexican Martin Luther King.” He found working conditions appalling for common Latino laborers in California, and co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, which is now called United Farm Workers. He organized civil rights activism, and became the Community Service Organization’s national director in 1958. His efforts to gain higher wages and better working conditions for farm laborers finally succeeded in 1966.

After that, he fought to restrict illegal immigrants from entering the U. S. and taking jobs from legal Mexican citizens. His birthday is a state holiday in California. He died in 1993, and the next year was awarded the Medal of Freedom from Bill Clinton.

Biko Steve

After Nelson Mandela was imprisoned in 1964, Steve Biko became the primary authority of the anti-Apartheid movement in South Africa. He founded the Black Consciousness Movement and advocated a worldwide “brotherhood of man.”

He was the primary architect of the protests that reached a head at the Soweto Uprising in June, 1976. He preached non-violence, which was not entirely heeded, and the uprising resulted in Apartheid police slaughtering school children at random in the crowds.

They then targeted Biko and finally caught him, and beat him to death, from 11 September to 12 September, 1977.

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Dorothy Day (November 8, 1897 – November 29, 1980) was an American journalist, distributist, and devout Catholic convert. In the 1930s, Day worked closely with fellow activist Peter Maurin to establish the Catholic Worker movement, a nonviolent, pacifist, movement that continues to combine direct aid for the poor and homeless with nonviolent direct action on their behalf. A revered figure within segments of the U.S. Catholic community, Day is being considered for sainthood by the Catholic Church. Day has been the recipient of numerous posthumous honors and awards. Among them: in 1992, she received the Courage of Conscience Award from the Peace Abbey, and in 2001, she was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, New York.

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Oskar Schindler was the most famous member of the Avenue of the Righteous. He saved 1,200 Jews from the Nazis by employing them in his munitions factories from 1943 to the end of the War. He therefore placed himself in extreme mortal peril constantly during that time, as the Nazis knew full well that his workers were Jewish.

He was very persuasive, having paid millions to the Nazi Party up to that time, and insisted that his workers were more useful to the Wehrmacht by manufacturing pots, pans, and ammunition. But secretly, he had his workers sabotage the ammunition so it would not function.

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On April 28, 1935, four years before the War even started, Eugenio Pacelli (soon to become Pope Pius XII) gave a speech that aroused the attention of the world press. Speaking to an audience of 250,000 pilgrims in Lourdes, France, the future Pius XII stated that the Nazis “are in reality only miserable plagiarists who dress up old errors with new tinsel. It does not make any difference whether they flock to the banners of social revolution, whether they are guided by a false concept of the world and of life, or whether they are possessed by the superstition of a race and blood cult.” During the war (when Pacelli had become Pope) he spoke out strongly in defense of the Jews with the first mass arrests in 1943, and L’Osservatore Romano carried an article protesting the internment of Jews and the confiscation of their property. The Fascist press came to call the Vatican paper ‘a mouthpiece of the Jews.’

Prior to the Nazi invasion, the Pope had been working hard to get Jews out of Italy by emigration; he now was forced to turn his attention to finding them hiding places: “[t]he Pope sent out the order that religious buildings were to give refuge to Jews, even at the price of great personal sacrifice on the part of their occupants; he released monasteries and convents from the cloister rule forbidding entry into these religious houses to all but a few specified outsiders, so that they could be used as hiding places. Thousands of Jews — the figures run from 4,000 to 7,000 — were hidden, fed, clothed, and bedded in the 180 known places of refuge in Vatican City, churches and basilicas, Church administrative buildings, and parish houses. Unknown numbers of Jews were sheltered in Castel Gandolfo, the site of the Pope’s summer residence, private homes, hospitals, and nursing institutions; and the Pope took personal responsibility for the care of the children of Jews deported from Italy.”

The consequences of the actions of Venerable Pope Pius XII in defense of the Jews were such that the Chief Rabbi of Rome (Rabbi Zolli) during WWII converted to Catholicism and changed his name to Eugenio (out of reverence for the Pope). [Source]

Read more: http://listverse.com/2009/11/04/top-10-people-robbed-of-the-nobel-prize/

1. Empty Bottle Micro Tank

Super easy and easy to follow instructions at College Life DIY.

2. Converted Xbox 360

Detailed instructions, and a video, are available at Blue World Aquariums.

3. Gumball Micro Aquarium

Learn how to make this mid-skill level tank at Instructables.

4. Non-Functioning Blender Betta Fish Tank

Read all about how to convert the kitchen appliance at Instructables.

5. Heated LED Coffee Hot Tropical Fish Tank

Step-by-step instructions at Robots and Computers.

6. Upcycled Retro Television Aquarium

Apartment Therapy has detailed instructions on how to create this vintage fish home.

7. Working Piano Aquarium

Extremely detailed instructions at Errthum.

8. Recycled Old CRT Monitor Fish Tank

Instructables explains each step, including how to safely remove the PC guts.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/donnad/household-items-begging-you-to-turn-them-into-aquariums

10 Greatest Killers of Man

Since time began, the single greatest act one can witness is the miracle of life. It occurs at every moment of every day. This admiration of life leads us to the fear and devastation that accompany the ending of said life. Throughout history, death has used many vessels to carry out its mission to end that life. Below you will find 10 couriers of death’s deed. Some of them are natural, brought forth by the forces of nature itself; some are terrible, due to the atrociousness of evil men, and some are the result of omission, the lack of prevention.

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Although many different cultures have legends that tell of men slaying thousands by their own hand, Simo Hayha is one of the deadliest soldiers of modern war. Nicknamed “White Death,” he can be found on various top ten lists, and for good reason. Often considered the greatest sniper to have served in war, Hayha is credited with over 800 kills. During the Winter War between Finland and the Soviet Union, Simo Hayha amassed 505 confirmed sniper kills (37 more unconfirmed) as well as over 200 confirmed kills by submachine gun. Even though his numbers are paltry compared to the rest of this list, he definitely earned the right to be recognized as one of the world’s deadliest soldiers. Here is a quote by Simo Hayha when asked if he regretted killing so many people: “I did what I was told to as well as I could.”

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The earliest form of this disease was probably found on the mummy of an Egyptian who died in 1157 BC. During the 20th century alone, it is estimated that Smallpox killed somewhere between 300 and 500 million people. With its mortality rate of 30-35%, and considering the ease with which smallpox is transmitted, pondering the historical impact of this disease is difficult. I was reluctant to include smallpox because it is practically extinct, but there is no denying it was one of the greatest killers nature brought upon Man, and therefore rightfully earns its place on this list.

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Called “the Monster of the Andes,” he was born to a 13 year old prostitute mother, in 1948. Lopez was picked up by a pedophile while still young, and was repeatedly raped before he was taken away by an American family and enrolled in a school for orphans. After being sodomized by a teacher, he ran away and found himself in prison at 18. There, Lopez was gang-raped and allegedly killed three of the rapists while still incarcerated. After his jail sentence was complete, his killing spree began. He claimed that by 1978 he had killed more than 100 young girls, and later he confessed to more than 300 murders. He eventually wound up in a psychiatric wing of a Bogota hospital in 1994, and since his release in 1998 has not been seen or heard from. It is not known if he is alive or dead.

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The hardest part about including religion on this list is how to label it. “Idea” seemed to best generalize the concept of what religion is, so I went with that. In most discussions of the topics on this list, many would agree that religion has caused more deaths in history than anything else. All of the entries on this list, as well as the ongoing turmoil in the Middle East: all are based on a religion, either manmade or reputed to be “of god.” The brutality of religion is well-documented and is apparent in all aspects of man’s existence. Even terrorism is often justified by its perpetrators “in the name of God”, or one of many variations. Whether one believes in that god or just uses the idea of that deity as a means to an end, there is no denying the billions of deaths that have been caused, either directly or indirectly, by religion.

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I considered selecting the Great Chinese Famine of 1958-1961 for this entry, because it killed between 15 million and 43 million people over the span of three years; however, I realized I wanted to include a single act of nature’s wrath. Various factors combined to cause the 1931 China floods, which killed anywhere from 1 million to 4 million people. The flood destroyed an estimated 80 million homes and ravaged agriculture along the Yellow, Yangtze and Huai rivers. The Three Gorges Dam project was implemented to help avoid this type of flooding; however, due to Soviet conflicts, the project was suspended until 1980, and finally completed in 2009.

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Listed as the second-greatest cause of death worldwide, smoking results in 10 percent of deaths around the globe, according to the World Health Organization. This adds up to roughly 5 million people annually. I don’t judge anyone who smokes; I personally wouldn’t do it, but to each their own. The WHO projects that 50% of smokers die from the habit. With 650 million smokers worldwide, that number alone portrays the global effects this habit will have on mankind. Of course, the most frustrating part is that smoking deaths are completely preventable. I know it’s easy for a non-smoker to say “don’t do it,” but there are methods in place to help one to quit, and maybe governments could become more involved by doing more than just taxing it, but that’s another discussion altogether.

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Although the mosquito, itself, is merely a carrier, it is certainly a harbinger of death. Known to be a common vector of over 15 diseases, mosquitoes are capable of spreading many blood-borne illnesses of parasitic nature. The worst of the diseases, and the one with the largest impact on man, is malaria. Malaria is responsible for one million deaths each year, and is among the leading causes of premature death in the world, second only to HIV/AIDS in Africa. The mosquito proves to be an effective transmitter due to its reproductive process. To make its eggs, it breaks down an enzyme found in the blood of animals and humans into amino acids. I would like to add that HIV has been found to be impossible to spread by mosquitoes. If this were to somehow change, then the world just might face its apocalypse.

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The mosquito earns its right as the deadliest non-rational animal, but the species known as Homo sapiens has easily caused the most deaths in history. Some may say it is religion, but I choose to say “man,” because regardless of the means one uses to bring death, it is all done by man’s hand, whether by war, religion, murder, etc. To go through the countless wars throughout history and to try to attain a cumulative total of deaths caused by war alone would take days, weeks or even months. Outside of war, murder and other direct causes of death, we are our own worst enemy. With the ability to annihilate the earth with “the press of a button,” man’s potential to end the lives of 6 billion people earns us the title as one of the deadliest vessels death uses to carry out its mission.

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I could have chosen Hitler from popular opinion, or Jesus, due to religion’s impact on history, but to do so would not have done Joseph Stalin justice. Although it will never be known how many deaths were caused by Stalin’s regime, estimates range from 15 million people to as many as 60 million. He became leader of the Soviet Union in 1924, following Vladimir Lenin’s death. Stalin’s body of work as Deadliest Man includes 7.5 million people from ethnic minorities being deported (25% death rate); the mass deaths of civilians located in territories occupied by the Nazis (approximately 20 million); the Soviet Famine of 1932-33 (a result of rapid industrialization); and millions of executions and gulags. One could even credit him with deaths due to the blatant disregard for his conscripts’ lives, as they were carelessly and forcibly tossed into battle, since Soviet military casualties reached approximately 35 million soldiers in WWII.

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The path one’s life will take is a mystery. The mark on history that one will leave is unknown. Life has many twists and turns, ups and downs, starts and stops; but regardless of the path a man’s individual journey has taken, death will always be there at the end. You can ask how, or who, or why, or when, but the only constant across all of the human lives who have come and gone is that time will always lead you to that death. It may be caused by the subjects of this list, it may not; but time will always lead you to the end of your life. Death can be hastened or delayed, but cannot be avoided. Time is the single constant found in this list, the vessel which death has summoned to carry out its purpose. Regardless of how or why one lives one’s life, at some moment in time, we will all find death.

Read more: http://listverse.com/2010/11/02/10-greatest-killers-of-man/

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With great power comes a whole bunch of creepy dudes who make Peter Parker’s life totally miserable.

    1. Marvel Comics ✓
    1. Marvel/Sony ✓
    1. Marvel Comics ✓
    1. Marvel/Sony ✓
    1. Marvel ✓
    1. Marvel/Sony ✓
    1. Marvel Comics ✓

Which Spider-Man Villain Are You?

  1. You got: The Lizard

    You’re a smart person and a generally upstanding citizen, but you have a dark side that sometimes gets in the way of all the good you do.

    Marvel Comics

  2. You got: Kraven the Hunter

    You live for adventure, and are constantly looking for a new thrill. That’s cool, but sometimes you take it a bit too far.

    Marvel Comics

  3. You got: Sandman

    You’re hard-working and unpretentious, but sometimes make unethical decisions when you feel like you’re not getting what you need.

    Marvel Comics

  4. You got: Electro

    You’re the kind of person who sometimes randomly lucks into great things, but you don’t take it for granted. You make the most of every opportunity you get.

    Marvel Comics

  5. You got: Hobgoblin

    You really enjoy the freedom that comes along with anonymity, and sometimes abuse that. You’re a very private person, and tend to be very secretive.

    Marvel Comics

  6. You got: Carnage

    You’re kind of a maniac, and don’t care if following your whims ends up hurting other people. You’re very scary, to be honest.

    Marvel Comics

  7. You got: Green Goblin

    You’re extremely ambitious and enjoy being in positions of influence, but sometimes give in to the inevitable temptations that come with power.

    Marvel Comics

  8. You got: Venom

    You have a tendency to get very attached to the people you care about, which can be cool, but can lead to a really bad scene if you ever get rejected.

    Marvel Comics

  9. You got: Doctor Octopus

    You’re very intelligent and you genuinely want to help other people, but get extremely frustrated when people don’t show you enough respect or credit you for your achievement.

    Marvel Comics

SHARE YOUR RESULTS

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/perpetua/which-spider-man-villain-are-you

1. Arika Sato

Arika’s channel is dedicated to giving both girls and guys a little bit of advice.

2. Andre Meadows aka Blacknerd!

Via Facebook

Andre’s channel is dedicated to you guessed it! ALL things nerdy! Sometimes he make rants, sometimes he talks about video games & other times he interviews hot girls.

3. The Hodge Twins

Via Fat Guy Radio Show

Double trouble. These twins have multiple channels, one that focuses on fitness, another that allows their fans to ask them questions, and another where they Vlog.

4. Csandreas

Via Youtube

Chris aka Csandreas likes to focus on nerd topics like Pokemon and other video games, however he also offers viewers excellent advice about dating, confidence and being happy.

5. iJustine

Everyone loves a pretty blonde that is willing to dance around an Apple store.

6. Jenna Marbles

Via Flickr

She is one of the most subscribed people on Youtube, not only is Jenna beautiful she is hilarious and incredibly intelligent.

7. Jimmy Tatro

Via Youtube

Jimmy Tatro has become one of everyone’s favorite frat guys due to his success with his channel Life According To Jimmy. He was recently in Grown Ups 2!

8. Melanie Rose aka MakeupByMel

Via Youtube

Mel is a popular beauty guru, but she also Vlogs while traveling and posts fashion related videos.

9. Michael Kory

Via Youtube

Michael Kory makes awesome workout videos and he has a cool accent.

10. Nicole Guerrero

Via Youtube

Nicole is a beauty guru with a vibrant personality; she makes celebrity inspired makeup tutorials along with product reviews and fashion hauls.

11. Ryan Higa

Ryan Higa is one of the original popular Youtubers and his popularity continues to grow! He often makes parody videos and comedy skits.

12. Scott Herman

Via Google

Scott Herman is a fitness model that posts videos three times a week all correlated with working out and getting fit.

13. Tyler Oakley

Via Youtube

Tyler’s channel focuses on a variety of topics like One Direction & Disney because of this he has acquired a huge fan base of teen girls.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/jaclynashley79/13-of-the-hottest-youtubers-c9vi